Couples therapy

Media Contact:

Kelly Chisholm
President of Albuquerque Family Counseling
(505)-974-0104
kellychis1@gmail.com

 Albuquerque Family Counseling sponsors National Marriage Week

ALBUQUERQUE, NM. – Albuquerque Family Counseling is getting involved with the well-known campaign, National Marriage Week USA. Every year, Marriage Week is promoted in various parts of the world from February 7-14.

In honor of this movement, Albuquerque Family Counseling is building an online campaign that offers incentives through local businesses in the NM area, in hopes to emphasize the importance of putting effort toward every marriage.

Prizes will be offered from the following local businesses:

  • Acequia Vineyards and Winery
  • All Things Boudoir
  • Enlighten Wellness Center

Albuquerque Family Counseling is initiating their involvement on their Facebook page, Albuquerque Family Counseling: @abqfamilycounseling. By visiting the Facebook page and participating in their posts the week of the national campaign, all viewers will have multiple chances to win a variety of prizes.

About ALBUQUERQUE FAMILY COUNSELING:

Albuquerque Family Counseling is a private practice specializing in couples and relationship counseling and coaching. With over 50 years of experience, Albuquerque Family Counseling is dedicated to continual training and development to bring the most current, proven, and effective methods to each client. All specialists have received training with the best-known relationship experts and programs in the country- Gottman, Imago, Emotion Focused Therapy, and Divorce Busting. Albuquerque Family Counseling has a 100-percent approval and referral rating from former clients.

Can Your Relationship Survive Infidelity? And Should It?

Relationship_survive_InfidelityTrust. It is the foundation of any relationship. There are few things that can break the trust in a relationship as well as cheating can. Now, is cheating a deal-breaker? Not necessarily. It certainly doesn’t have to ring an end to a normal healthy relationship.

Have you been cheated on? Before you end your relationship, it is important to think carefully and consider the circumstances. Consider your partner as a whole. Is he/she otherwise honest? It won’t be easy, but if you trust your partner and feel that they are truly remorseful, you may want to consider working through the infidelity to keep your relationship.

But what if they have a track pattern of infidelity and other dishonest behavior? If so, you first need to decide if you are willing to stay. If you do decide to stay, it is important that both you and your partner are willing to work together to get to the root of these issues. Sit down together and establish game plan, such as couples’ counseling. Know that if they cannot be open, honest and willing to admit that there is an issue, counseling won’t be effective…and their dishonest behavior is likely to continue.

While considering your partner, don’t forget to consider yourself. Think about how being cheated on made you feel. Can you forgive them and let go? If not, that is perfectly okay. Think deeply about yourself and the principles that you value and live your life by. You might feel that this is the ultimate betrayal and that you cannot stay with your partner. There is no point in staying in a relationship if you know that you won’t be happy. If you decide to stay, know that your feelings of hurt, betrayal and disappointment will fade with time as long as both you and your significant other work together to rebuild the bridge of trust that once bonded you together as a couple.

The roots of trust are built in our childhood, where we learn to receive consistent, predictable care from our parents. Trust is built on order and predictability, which makes it even more psychologically traumatizing when that trust is broken.  Studies have shown that psychological traumas (like discovering an affair) can have an effect on brain functioning long after the event has happened.

One of these common changes is the development of hyper-vigilance to prevent further assaults. Being hyper-vigilant is a survivor perspective, it protects us from harm.

These behaviors are commonly acted out by the partner who has been betrayed, by being looking for and being ultra aware of any change in behavior or pattern from their partner.  Unfortunately, being hyper-vigilant is non discriminating. This puts us in a position to mistrust everyone around us- other family members, co-workers, spiritual leaders. This is harmful to our social connections- how can we prevent ourselves from mistrusting everyone around us after a betrayal?

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$299 for 4 sessions (Regularly $400) or individual session $79